Security Myths: Trading Functionality for Security

  • Security Myths: Trading Functionality for Security

One of the more common myths in security is that it will always compete with functionality of a system. There is some element of truth in the idea, but it’s often touted as a reason for not putting security in place which is something we need to move past as an industry.

The problem is that it is true, to a degree. Once a system is built layering security protections on top will always have some impact on functionality and usability, whether that’s by requiring additional authentication by users, restricting connectivity, or simply by impacting performance. And there lies the problem – it’s true when layering security on top of an existing system.

If a system is designed with security considerations from the ground up, placed on an equal footing at the beginning of requirements gathering as other functional and non-functional requirements, then there is no need to have a significant impact on the functionality of a system. In fact, given that one of the best ways to apply security at design is to simplify and automate, designing for both security and function will usually result in a more secure, more robust, and more functional system.

Yes, it does involve more up-front work, and some additional expense, but in terms of the effort saved on sticking web application firewalls, additional incompatible authentication mechanisms, and external monitoring systems among many other point solutions in front of a system quickly pays back that initial effort.

So more accurately, security will always be a trade off with functionality when it is applied too late to a system. When it is incorporated into requirements and built in as a core part of the design, this idea no longer needs to apply.

Join the discussion

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.